In pm's words
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August 13, 2017, 1:44 PM

the one about Jesus being here in the midst of it...


Sermon from August 13, 2017

Text: Matthew 14: 22-33, 1 King 19:9-18

Grace and peace to you from God our Creator and our Lord and Savior Jesus who is the Christ – will y’all pray with me? May the words of my mouth and the meditations of all our hearts be acceptable in your sight O Lord, our rock and our redeemer; amen!

So, this is our second week of miracles and this is a big one, right? Jesus walks on the water! But, I noticed something this week. We focus on the spectacular and miraculous of this story (as this part of Matthew’s gospel is titled Jesus walks on Water), but have you ever noticed that this particular part of the story really isn’t about Jesus walking in a way that others can’t.

Sure, it’s a big deal, especially when Peter asks to walk out to Jesus as well. Peter tries, which seems like par for the course for this great disciple, he doesn’t quite make it.

But, when we focus on just Jesus walking on the water, we lose sight of other stuff – important and faithful stuff – that is going on as well.

This story occurs immediately after the feeding miracle we heard last week. Jesus sends the disciples back on the boat. He’ll catch up. Finally, Jesus is able to venture off alone to the mountain to pray, reflect, and possibly mourn the death of John the Baptist (it’s what he was trying to do before he was sidetracked by the crowds).

During this time and evening with Jesus on the mountain, the sea becomes rougher as the wind picks up and pushes the boat further from the coast. Then Jesus descends from the mountain early the following morning. He sees the boat and walks out there. No big deal (yeah right).

The disciples see him – they see someone – and they’re taken aback, afraid even. Jesus assures them that it is he, and then Peter calls out to the Lord to command him to walk on the waves as well. Alright, come on then.

Peter begins, but he is soon overcome with fear because of the wind and the waves. As he begins to sink down, Peter cries out and Jesus reaches out and grabs him. He’s safe.

Jesus gets in the boat, the wind stalls, and the disciples proclaim him to be the Son of God.

Quite a bit of action in this short little pat of Matthew’s gospel.

Since it is another miracle story we know well, we just go from point A to point B because we’ve done it before. Kind of like when you’re driving home from work – the same route you’ve taken for years – and there’s that one time that you don’t really remember driving it. You know you left your office, and then you were at your home. It’s scary when those things happen – because you missed out and looked past all those other ‘familiar’ sights.

So, the temptation here is to misremember the timeline. There’s the storm, Jesus calms it, and walks on the water. And then talks to the disciples.

Except, that’s not really how it happened. Throughout this whole story, the winds don’t cease until after Jesus gets back in the boat.

I think that’s pretty significant. Especially as it pertains to our lives of faith.

In this part of Matthew’s gospel, in this little sliver of life and faith that we see of Jesus – our wind doesn’t cease until after the disciples know they’re safe.

Think about it. When life is a storm, rocking away, what’s the one thing we pray, hope, and yearn for? If you’re like me its that the seas stop crashing, the wind dies down, and the boat of life floats in calm waters.

I think that might be what the disciples were wanting too. Especially with the added drama and fear of someone walking out where they shouldn’t be. That can be scary.

In the middle of choppy sea of life, as the seas foam and the wind blows, we just want the storm to cease and the winds to die down. Then Lord, walk to us so that you can help us.

I had planned at this point to write something about the beginning of school and to preach about the storms those new beginnings can bring. But after the events of yesterday in Charlottesville, VA. I don’t think I can anymore.

We live life now within choppy waters. The seas rage and the winds blow. Evil rises up. Fears heighten. We saw that come to fruition yesterday as a young man, distorted in his views about people different from him, drove his car into them. Something that we have seen happen in other parts of the world, but it happened here. Just a half a day’s drive from Newberry.

There is a temptation to only speak once things have died down. To only speak while looking back and saying that it was wrong and despicable. But, the storm is out there now as it rages and the winds blow. We are called in our faith, called out by Christ to speak against the things that we saw and read about from yesterday.

We yearn for those calm waters so that we might speak. We yearn for that time of tranquility to talk as we look back together and agree with one another that this was of course sinful. That it is wrong and evil to disparage someone - to hate someone - because of the color of their skin, the faith they believe, the ideology they identify with, or the life they live. That it is wrong to have such radicalized thoughts in your heart that you seek to hurt, to maim, to even murder others, other children of God.

It is in those moments, as the storms rage within our souls about whether we should speak – be it from the pulpit, your cubicle, on the golf course, at the restaurant, or out on the streets – it is in those moments, that we remember that Christ is right there with us. Our Lord has indeed stretched out those merciful hands and holds us tight so that we know we are not sinking down.

It is right and faithful of us to say – This isn’t what God desires. At all. This isn’t what Jesus calls us towards. As we prepare to speak out against such hateful views that storm and those rising waters strike fear into our hearts. We don’t want to ruffle feathers. We don’t want to ‘get political’ or talk about ‘race.’

There is even temptation to just move our little boat out of those waters and find calmer seas. Pulling ourselves away from that turmoil. To just ignore and look past.

But, we can’t. Not anymore.

We remember that Jesus is right there. Standing firm in resolve as we speak definitively and defiantly against those who distort the Gospel truth. Who speak ill and seek to harm and hurt those who are different from their experience of life.

As hard as it is to comprehend, we also remember that Jesus stands with those who seek harm, speak hateful words, and act out terrible and evil plans. Not hurling the same rhetoric. Not participating in the same monstrous deeds. But, reminding us that we are indeed called to love and pray for our enemies and those who persecute us.

Yet, I know that loving someone doesn't have to mean we cannot speak firmly in opposition to their views. Loving someone doesn't mean I can't stand in the way of hate while protecting those that are being attacked. Loving someone doesn't mean I let them 'get away' with any of the things that they say or do that are against Jesus' call to love those around us.

In the life of the Christian - there is NO ROOM for the sort of violence (physical, verbal, visual, and spiritual) that were shown in the streets of Charlottesville. No. Room. At. All. That's not what Jesus stood for in any way shape or form. In our love, we say no.

The waves rise and the wind continues to push against the boat.

Our cry and our prayer during those times is for the storm to stop. The waves to calm. The wind to stall.

Lord, just calm the storm around me so that I can know you’re with me. Make all this stuff around me disappear so I know you’re here.

I noticed in this text that all of this is happening as the waves still rise and crash and the wind still blows. The wind is strong enough to distract Peter as he walks out to Jesus. Distracts him enough that his fear begins to overwhelm him and he begins to be surrounded by the waves.

Yet, the one he thought was so far off, was right there. Reaches out and grabs him. Lifts him up and places him in the boat. His presence calms the disciples there as well. He’s right there. He’s with them. The storm around them might ‘rage,’ but the storm within them is calmed. They know they are safe.

Then, and only then do the winds cease. Do the waters calm. Does the boat become still.

I thought of that stillness as I read our text from 1 Kings. Where God was not in the fire, the storm, or the earthquake – all the places one would expect to find God. Instead God was present in the calm and the sound of sheer silence. That was the holy place in which Elijah stepped out to speak from the cave.

That calm stillness – in the midst of the storm – because we know that God is there. Because we know that Christ is present. The one who reaches out and grabs us.

I like to think that Peter didn’t get very far on the water. Mostly because Peter was known for biting off more than he could chew and falling spectacularly in his faith. Jesus was ‘far off’ enough that they thought him to be a ghost, nevertheless the one who grasps him in the waters was right there. Firm and strong to raise him up and place him back in the boat.

As we look out into the life we live; a life with all its waves, wind, and more – we have faith that Jesus is present with us in the midst of it all. Calming us to see and know our Lord within the stillness and silence of ourselves. Where that prayer changes from, “Lord calm the seas and wind so that I can know you’re here.” to “Lord, I know your calm and peace is here within me so that I can venture through these waters.”

Remember, Jesus is here. Jesus reaches out to hold you in his grasp. Reminding you again and again that though the seas may rage – and do they ever rage – that you are not alone. You are not abandoned.

Jesus is here as we speak out against groups like the KKK, Nazis, and the alt-right. Jesus is here with you as you speak a loving NO to those who try to disparage, rail against, or harm another through words and actions simply because of their skin, faith, country of origin, or life.

Jesus reaches out to calm us all in the midst of the storms. Jesus is in that calm. That calm that those hands are holding you firmly and tightly. That’s the sheer silence of peace. God indeed is present with you. Present with us. Amen.

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